American vs European Romance languages

Which of the top 3 Romance languages varies the most from one continent to the other (sort of like US English vs UK English)?

Québec French vs European French

Brazilian Portuguese vs European Portuguese

Latin American Spanish vs European Spanish

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Polish Childrens Books

Hej, I was wondering if anyone can give me any suggestions for kids books (or any books you felt helped) to learn Polish. I'm at the point where I think I can start reading, but nothing like for example Harry Potter, 1984. So I was wondering if anyone here was read or used any books that would help?

Thanks!

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Korean Sucess

https://invite.duolingo.com/BDHTZTB5CWWKS5CFZOMOQU7M64?v=sm . So I have been learning Korea on Duolingo and it has been going pretty good. I'm starting to differentiate between cool and uncool, interesting and uninteresting, meaningful and non meaningful and other comparisons while learning the Korean alphabet and vocabulary. Good start.

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I'm Autistic with Moderate Learning Difficulties and i'm currently learning Japanese that I started since around 2015/2016. Any advice I need to know?

Hello r/languagelearning

I made a similar post on r/LearnJapanese 3 months ago and I had some great advice/tips/websites given to me and I thought I might ask this Subreddit and here I am. ;)

I'm embarrassed to say that after 4/5 years, I'm still haven't finished with hiragana yet, (actually, I'm almost finished with Hiragana, I just need to practice writing out ま、み、む、め, も。and the other characters that has the dots and circles below the character. Afterwards, I'll start on both Katakana, Grammar and Kanji. For Kanji, i'm close to fully understand how Kanji work and I'm might be compared.

My biggest problem is Procrastination, which I believe is symptoms of both Moderate Learning Difficulties and Autism. I always spend time on the computer and I do have a big YouTube addiction, although I have took advantage of my YouTube addiction and tried learning hiragana via video, but no success, Right now, my learning style is basically the same as how Japanese Children learn Kanji, (Writing it out again and again and AGAIN) or at least that's how I learn hiragana, might use this for Katakana and Kanji but not sure if I want to use this for vocabulary and grammar.

I tried Anki and I didn't have any success but that's because I probably used it wrong, so I might get back to it and try using it probably.

Here are the reasons why I want to learn Japanese, incase your wondering (copyed from my r/LearnJapanese post)

  1. I find the Japanese culture, animation, music and the language very fascinating. for the language, I love the uniqueness of it and I love how it sounds and I like how each character in the kana charts only have one sound (with some exceptions) which I find beneficial for me because I struggle pronouncing most of the English vocabulary due to the sounds being a bit... complicated. I also like how the grammar is a bit simplified on some parts (e.x using the adjectives on it's own can have multiple meanings) There are some more but I want to keep this short.

  2. I want to challenge myself and I want to be more intelligent and less ignorant. As a Autistic with Moderate Learning Difficulties, I always imagine necrotypicals describing people like me as "low functioning" I'm not low functioning, I consider myself high functioning, even though I have a suspicion that my parents think otherwise. Learning Japanese can be a turning point in my life. To keep this short, I want to be intelligent as I believe intelligence = a more happy lifestyle, and I want to proof to people that autistics like me can learn by ourselves without a teacher. We just need time, motivation, and fairness, Japanese and Computing are the only two that I feel more motivation with and my School has put a bad taste in my mouth in terms of English, Maths and other subjects (ended up with 2 very low level GCSE English and no GCSE Maths) and I have no desire to improve my English and Maths because I'll be reminded of my mediocre Special Needs School and that sucks, On the bright side I feel like my English vocabulary will increase as I learn advanced Japanese vocabulary and probably becoming a more sociable person as I need to find a Japanese speaker to talk to. Hooray for upsides!

Also as I studying Japanese I learn things about myself about how I learn (What learning style is suitable, How do I teach myself, etc) which is a positive experience for me and gives me hope about myself. (e.g, I seen a comment on Reddit stating if you learn some bits of how grammar work, then you'll understand about how most of the grammar work, I had minor doubts at first but as I read more about the Japanese Grammar, the more I learn about how it works. I never have that feeling until that time,) now that's the feeling of motivation.

For that last part, I don't view myself positively for obvious reasons, but whenever I success and feel accomplished, it gives me hope about myself.

So, r/languagelearning

Do you have any advice/tips/recommendations I should know?

Looking forward to your comments.

(If you have any questions regarding my Autism and Moderate Learning Difficulties, don't be shy to ask.)

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Good learning resources for learning Dutch/Norwegian from German?

I just wanted to know if anyone here knows any good resources to learn Dutch or Norwegian through German. Especially grammar books and workbooks

Thanks for any help.

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What is best way and resource to learn german at home?

I have completed my first year of university in a three year undergraduate program. I am planning to do my masters from Germany.

I have started doing Duolingo from continuously 10 days. So I wanted to ask. Is Duolingo is enough for learning German?

For appearing all those A1 B1 type program which course i should prefer? I am free in summer so this is perfect time for me to learn this.

Thank you!

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Resources for teaching children intermediate Spanish

Hi,

I'm trying to teach my son Spanish. I'm fluent, but I learned it as an adult. I studied abroad in a Spanish speaking country when my son was 3.5, so by the time he turned 4, he was monolingual Spanish. When we returned to the United States, he reversed very quickly to only speaking English. I wanted everyone who would, to speak Spanish to him, but he was experiencing reverse culture shock and wanted to fit in with his English speaking friends again. He would actually start crying when someone spoke to him in Spanish, so I eased off. He has been around Spanish speakers, and always spoke at least a little, and his comprehension was pretty good. He's 8 now and I've been trying to revive his Spanish. I got some of the beginning Spanish books and flashcards for him, but he is nearing the end of those. They cover key words like months, seasons, counting, things like that. Other than speaking to him in Spanish as much as possible, what are some ways to take his Spanish to the next level? Intermediate Spanish resources seem to be aimed at adults or high schoolers, so I don't think they're age appropriate for him. I have him watching Spanish movies and cartoons which he enjoys, and am starting to read books to him in Spanish. Any other suggestions? (I'm not rich btw. I can't send him to an international school or anything like that.)

Thanks

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How much can you learn in a day?

I have 3 months before I start university and one of my summer goals is to begin learning German. I've got a considerable amount of free time so it should be achievable.

I'm just curious of how much I can learn in a day, like what is a realistic limit that beyond which learning new words isn't productive at all.

Each morning/night i'll be going over the flashcards I make on my app and every 5 days of learning doing a test on them all where the ones I get wrong I specifically focus on. But how much should I learn in each 'lesson'?

Danke schöne

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Spanish or Japanese?

So basically I'm at a crossroads: learn Spanish or Japanese. As a bit of context: I (23m) am currently living with my father and he's agreed to pay for all of my necessities provided I go to school (10 month program for web design). Its a super relaxed schedule, the work and study can be done from home, and being late or missing class isn't ever a problem provided I get the work and study done. All that being said, it's still 30+ hours of study/work a week if I want to be a competent web designer (learn html/css, javascript, wordpress, Adobe applications, ecommerce/liquid, etc..). Language learning fits into my schedule perfectly, and because of where my fathers from (and his poor english) I wanted to learn Spanish. I'm in south florida so finding practice outside of talking to him isn't difficult, and it could help me build my portfolio here. The thing is I really don't like spanish. Not saying I dont respect it, I do, but as far as passion is concerned it's just not there. What I mean by that is after years of attempting to learn, and after the past month of seriously (min 2 hours a day studying + speaking) trying to learn, I just don't have any eagerness or excitment for learning - rather, its truly dreadful. All I want to do is talk to my dad and make him proud. Hes done so much for me. Japanese comes into play because its been a monolithic goal of mine to go there. I love the culture, the architecture, the history, nature and I've been saving the pennys I can scrape together for a ticket. Also - the olympic games. The thing is If I can stay there I will; Ive reached out to a couple of host families/businesses on workaway and they've confirmed that english teachers are in exceptionally high demand (in part due to expected 2020 tourism), and designing/improving there websites is something theyd be willing to pay for. So acquiring a work visa is possible! I've learned harigana before and the grammatical structure (verb at the end, usage of formal speech, etc...) is so interesting. My question is: which should I pursue? From a language learners perspective where is the real value in the language you chose to learn? Have you ever learned a language begrudgingly for practicalities sake? Any and all responses (criticisms too) are appreciated.

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Learning Arabic, if anyone is learning Arabic, stopped learning, has learned Arabic or is interested can you please do the survey? It's for a project I'm hoping to start.

Learning Arabic, if anyone is learning Arabic, stopped learning, has learned Arabic or is interested can you please do the survey? It's for a project I'm hoping to start. submitted by /u/cheesy_bits
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For self learners: Do you make a set study lesson/schedule or other?

This is something I've been wondering about and somewhat struggling with for a while and hoped this would be the right place to ask!

I've been attempting to learn Korean on and off for over a year. I'm not as far as I should be because I keep falling off the wagon (which is entirely my fault for several reasons) but I really want to start taking it seriously so I at least spend every day learning something new about it (even it's just a new word.)

I'm attempting entirely alone, until I get good enough to hopefully sign up for a language exchange program with a native speaker as I hear that's a great way to improve. I would happily pay for a tutor, but my internet isn't the best for Skype or voice calls.

So I was wondering, to the self learners who have found success with any language, did you make a study plan for yourself (using your own materials and/or apps) and follow that? Or just select your materials and just sort of dive in, following along with set steps from apps and/or websites, etc? And what worked best for you?

I understand what works for some won't work for everyone, but seeing your replies could help me put together my own system that works. I have plenty of apps and ebooks downloaded, I guess I'm just never sure where exactly to start or how to continue, even if the apps tell me, especially when I'm using multiple ones (if that makes sense.)

Thank you so much in advance!

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Need Advice on my Anki flashcards method!

Hi all,

I am using Anki flashcards along with my Assimil Spanish study book to learn Spanish (native English speaker). Each lesson has several sentences, which must be translated from Spanish to English. I input each sentence with translation into my Anki flashcard collection.

My question is, should I be translating the Spanish sentences to English with a DIRECT translation, or a LITERAL translation. For example with the sentence: "Usted no tiene nada en ningún sitio."

- A DIRECT translation to English would be: "You not have nothing in no place."

- A LITERAL translation would be: "There's nothing wrong with you anywhere."

I am currently using direct translations to learn each sentence. Obviously I can understand what the translation means, but I would not say that direct translation if I were speaking in English normally.

It's easier to translate each sentence with a direct translation, because then each word is accounted for and I can understand the usage of each word. Obviously it would be harder to translate the sentences with a literal translation.

However, I'm worried about how I'll be able to communicate in Spanish when the time comes. Since the literal structure in English would appear in my mind, and then I would translate it into Spanish to whomever I'm speaking with.

Can any language learners give me some advice on this subject? I have been studying Spanish for about 2 months now, and I am currently on Lesson 29 in the Assimil Spanish study book.

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A really good video I found about listening practice!

I struggle a lot with understanding all my languages when they are spoken and this is a really good idea for listening practice. The video is about Portuguese, but obviously it can be applied to any language you are learning. It is writing what you are hearing while you are listening to it. I haven't tried it yet, but I thought I'd share it for all you peeps who struggle with listening as much as I do!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KW4HzhIG7ms

If you already do this technique, write whether it works for you!

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Judge my accent - Record your voice and get opinions - June 26, 2019"

Welcome to the JudgeMyAccent thread. Each week on Wednesday at 06:00 UTC, I, your faithful Automoderator, will be hosting a thread where in users can record their voice and get opinions from native speakers. Also check out /r/JudgeMyAccent.

Here's how it will work:

  • Go to http://vocaroo.com/ or http://soundcloud.com/ or https://clyp.it/ and record your voice. (No other recording service will be allowed).

  • 1 comment should contain only 1 language. Format should be as follows: LANGUAGE - LINK + TEXT (OPTIONAL). Eg. French - http://vocaroo.com/------- Text: J'ai voyagé à travers le monde pendant un an et je me suis senti perdu seulement quand je suis rentré chez moi.

  • Native or Fluent speakers can give their opinion by replying to the comment and are allowed to criticize positively. (Tip: Use CTRL+F to find the languages)

Consider sorting by new.

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Emotive Language And Its Benefits In Writing

The development of the use of emotive language has been effective and necessary for the purpose of dealing with the growth of the long term management and engagement of the audience with the writing of the author. Learn more about emotive language.

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Attempting to learn some languages. Any free websites, programs, etc to learn fluency/?

I am attempting to gain literacy in Korean (fluency), Mandarin (fluency), Latin, Arabic (fluency maybe?), Hebrew, and Greek.

Any free websites, programs, apps, etc that I could use to gain literacy and/or fluency. Duolingo just isn't cutting it, haha.

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The darkest of the seas, does it mean the darkest seas?

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Does anyone know of a great way to start on Albanian?

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No Pain, No Gain Strategy

What I mean by using this phrase is that you cannot see progress without “pain.” Not physical pain in this situation, of course, but overcoming mental challenges that you set for yourself. In this language learning theory of mine, which I’m sure is built in my head from other sources, I believe that to learn the fastest, which is necessary when you’re an adult in the adult world, you need to constantly be challenging yourself. However, getting the motivation to overcome those challenges is the tough part. It’s the part we agonize over, the point where it’s either you make it or you break it. In the case of language learning, you either reach the point of fluency, or you learn maybe a handful of phrases then never pick it up again. Anybody who has even dabbled in this hobby can understand that. Travel phrase books are proof of that, they’re a perfect way to learn in a pinch when you have absolutely 0 motivation to learn until fluency.

Time is the key when it comes to acquiring deep knowledge of a language. Without spending hours of time actually building your skill in another language, you will never truly reach the endgame which everybody desires. And I put emphasis on actually because here’s where I bring the street smarts into the book smarts: you need to struggle to increase your skill and we need to overcome our anxieties in order to progress. And since I’m casually writing this post anyway, I’m going to list out some tips I’ve learned so far instead of going full essay format:

  1. Decide on one language to learn, and stick with it. You need to commit. Most people, unless you make language-learning a part of your career or you get serious about the hobby, don’t have time to get intimate with multiple languages at once. Especially because to retain the knowledge that you’ve learned, you need to actively be using the language. Luckily it’s like riding a bike where you’ll never truly “forget” something when the memory bond in your brain is solidified enough. However, you will basically be re-reading a book you’ve already read before. You already know what happens in the story, but you do have to physically put the time in reading it again. Some people are really good at learning and maintaining multiple languages and they’re called polyglots, but not even the most experienced polyglot can claim to be fluent in every single language they have learned about. It’s fun to be one, though, because language learning does have a fun side too.

  2. There will be a point where you reach a plateau, and you shouldn’t panic. In the beginning of learning about a language, it might seem super easy and doable, especially if you start with beginner material. (By the way, you SHOULD start with beginner material, there’s no point in diving straight into the deep end of the pool on your first day of swimming lessons). This has been found to be because since you’re encountering so much new information, everything seems “fresh.” There will be a point though where everything seems to get, well, stale. The first language learning hurdle, when you get to around B1-B2 so I’ve heard, might take some time but it’s doable. However, the second hurdle after that just seems impossible. There’s entire cultures of countries where people speak the language to learn about, idioms and expressing abstract concepts, understanding different accents, and more. And this is the part where, to save the most amount of time possible on your treacherous journey, you need to get uncomfortable. You need that, sweet, sweet i m m e r s i o n. And when I say immersion I’m not talking about what Rosetta Stone claims is providing immersion, but actually taking that leap of faith and making mistakes in another language by talking to people (aka you gotta prove yourself out there, kid). When you speak you won’t be confident at first and that’s what you can “hack” to get better, faster. If there was a way to create 1 language learning program that encompasses everything you need to learn the fastest with the least amount of effort, then there would be no need for multiples upon multiples of different language learning software. Unless doing it out of the goodness of their heart, the creators of language learning specific resources need to make a profit, so you can spot businesses trying to make a quick buck by how outrageous their claims are.

  3. Now, this isn’t to say those who learned without immersion did it the “wrong” way because there really is no wrong way to learn something. Everyone learns things in their own way personal to them and there’s no way to teach that besides doing it. However, unless you’re an actual genius, you need time and exposure to learn something. A lot of time and exposure. And what better way to get that than by speaking to other speakers of your target language, consuming material made by speakers, and by forming special bonds with things from the culture of that language? I won’t go over this point in detail since it was already done in this TedTalk which I recommend watching, but building off of that, forming special memories associated with the words will help you much more than reviewing flashcards or pouring over translations. I know about this personally. My Japanese still sucks because I only learned through translations, never actually forming my own sentences whether out loud or written.

  4. Talking with others in a language you’re learning is anxiety-inducing. And that’s good. Finding a kind enough person to try to understand you anyway and fix your mistakes is a literal blessing. This is why finding a specific language learning partner is so important. The easiest way to do this would be to hire a tutor, like on iTalki. It’s even better if you can forge a legitimate friendship by meeting people on Discord servers or HelloTalk for example, which can be tougher. Of course there’s always the most effective but dangerous strategy which would be to drop yourself into a country or community with native speakers with nobody else there to help you navigate your new life. It definitely gets you results, but at what cost?

  5. Vary your sources! There are so many great resources out there for free, you just need to put the effort in for searching for them. You will need to ask people from other cultures to show you the good stuff, and you should seek out other learners so they can recommend which resources to use.

Making mistakes is vital to learning. It's a common piece of advice, but for good reason. You will see your progress improve at such a rapid pace when you take the risk of embarrassment and put yourself out there. It's easier said than done and I need to practice it myself, but getting to a point where you can communicate on a native level in another language is amazing and worthy of respect. Not to say we should hold successful bilinguals on a pedestal that we will never be able to reach, because that just fosters resentment and lack of passion. Rather, we should copy the strategies of these successful learners to one day be able to call yourself one of them.

I hope everyone reading can make cool memories using their target language and I hope my ramblings were useful to someone. Good luck with your studies!

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Anyone else accidentally mix their languages?

Sup. American here. My second language is Spanish and I’ve been speaking it for like 5 years, so I’m pretty good, but of course not perfect, and speak it at work a lot.

Anyways, I’ve been learning French and studying daily for a few months now, and I sometimes have a little hiccup when I switch language “modes.”

Like, I’ll wake up, study French for a few hours, then go to work and greet my Spanish-speaking coworker, and what comes out is a sentence that starts in Spanish and ends in French.

That happen to y’all, too? Did you eventually become skilled enough in both languages and this stopped happening?

Mucha merci.

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The word I most hope that I never need to write

The word I most hope that I never need to write submitted by /u/azyxxi
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Duolingo now has an Arabic course for English speakers!!

Duolingo now has an Arabic course for English speakers!! submitted by /u/mariamelawadyy
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Why Duolingo?

Just curious, why do you think Duolingo is so popular? If someone wants to learn those languages, there are thousands of apps to choose from. What makes Duolingo stand out?

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Eli5: difference between meaning, definition, explanation, concept, theory.

5 headings. Please ELI5. Thank you!

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