Showing posts with label Тавтай морилогтун | Languagelearning. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Тавтай морилогтун | Languagelearning. Show all posts

Crisis about what language to take at university

I'm a freshman and want to begin a language this semester, and the two options I'm interested in are Elementary German (just first-level, meets every day for an hour each week) and Intensive Italian (first and second level, meets every day for an hour and a half each week). I have plenty of previous experience with Spanish, so I'm comfortable in the Romance category, but the Italian class is also twice the speed of German (which could be helpful) and has a quiz every day. I've tried a little bit of both out on Duolingo as well as listening to recording of both, and I can say that I definitely love and have an interest in both languages, but for different reasons—a love of the beauty of Italian literature and the complexity of German philosophy. I also spoke to the Italian professor, and, despite the fact that I am generally intimidated by language-learning (from high school experience), I connected really well with him and felt like he could make the intense learning really fun. He said that by the end of the course, I'd know about 4000 words (and students who do well can skip ahead of third and fourth levels). The idea generally of learning a language this quickly and getting a head start, perhaps even taking up German next year (Intensive or Elementary track, not sure), really appeals to me, as intimidated as I am, and maybe I would benefit from the pressure-cooker in learning it.

I apologize for the block of text, but does anyone have any advice over things I can do or seek out or consider to resolve this dilemma? I've had a bit of analysis-paralysis for about a month or two about this, and I'll need to decide which class to attend by the time I wake up tomorrow morning.

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People that learned both Korean or Japanese. What are the difficult and easy things in each of them?

So far, based on my limitted knowledge. I only know that both of them are SOV language. Korean has an alphabet, meanwhile Japanese still uses Kanji, that's all i know

It would be interesting to hear the things and experiences that you guys gained through years of studying these languages

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Is it realistic to self teach Greek?

I've been fascinated by the language for years now, and I regularly travel from the UK to Greece and have always wanted to be able to speak to the locals in their own language rather than relying on English. The only real language learning experience I've got is from studying French at school, and even then I've only managed to reach a very basic level.

In terms of Greek, I've taught myself some very basic individual words, and of course have learned the Greek alphabet as it is so different to English, but is it realistic to continue with the prospect of reaching a level of conversational Greek?

If anyone has any reccomendations on resources like textbooks etc. that would be really helpful! I much prefer working from physical books and watching videos. Also any ideas for grammar books and videos would be brilliant.

Ευχαριστώ!

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What are some online sites for learning languages?

Or apps like duolingo

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I know it's bad to work in bursts, but finally quit procrastinating on my German Anki

I know it's bad to work in bursts, but finally quit procrastinating on my German Anki submitted by /u/9th_Planet_Pluto
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Weekly Question/Discussion Thread - January 13, 2019

If you are new and/or have basic questions about language learning, please read the Wiki before posting. Language specific resources can be found there too. You are welcome to post any follow-up questions.

Welcome to the Weekly Discussion Thread. Each week on Sunday 18:00 UTC, I, your faithful Automoderator, will be hosting a thread in which beginners and pros alike may ask questions, share any interesting insights they may have discovered or simply share with the sub their recent achievements.

Anything may be posted, but Weekly Question/Discussion is primarily intended for posts/insights/questions too small to warrant a new thread and for beginners to ask questions and seek help without the embarrassment of having to clog up the main page.

Please consider sorting by new.

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Why do some expatriates learn Arabic quickly?

Why do some expatriates learn Arabic quickly? submitted by /u/questiondudes
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Torn between two languages: One practical and one desired.

I am currently torn between focusing my efforts in two languages. One language appeals more from a practical sense while the other language is something I have wanted to learn since I was a child. The languages are quite different from one another and neither one would benefit as much in learning the other one. The two languages, of course, are German and Japanese. I want to lay out my logic for each here in hopes that someone else on Reddit has been in a similar position and may have some advice that will help me figure out where to go from here.

The case for German is pretty simple: My family is from West Germany (about two generations back, my father does not speak German) and I have native friends that I communicate with on a daily basis. I visit Germany about once a year because it is the most financially feasible foreign destination for me - I simply have to cover the cost of airfare and food, since I stay with my German friends there is no lodging cost. Originally I had thought that English would take me very far in Germany as a tourist, but surprisingly outside of large cities such as Berlin, it is more difficult to get around with just English. They live outside of Stuttgart in Berkheim and I found that many of the locals did not speak English well enough to be comfortable speaking it to an American - which is fine, I am in Germany after all and I shouldn't expect everyone to speak in my native language. The rest of Germany in smaller areas seemed hit or miss, though in traveling to the Netherlands I found that a lot of people did speak fluent English once I got to more populated areas.

There isn't a huge interest in German literature and not too much in music. I enjoy listening to some German pop music - only because the rhythm is good. German history is interesting though, one of the memories I have from my first trip is standing in a castle that was once the cities central defense and realizing that this castle has stood for longer than my home country has been founded. One of the appeals of learning German is being able to converse with some of the older population and learn more about the history of the country from firsthand accounts.

German itself is closer to English than Japanese, so I would expect to reach a usable level much faster based on that. What I have found though, is that there isn't as big of a community for learning it as Japanese and that there aren't as many highly recommended at-home study materials for German. My resources are currently: Babbel, GermanPod101, memrise, and SmarterGerman. Of those resources, GermanPod101 has been my faovirte so far. One of the perks with the language being a bit easier to learn for a native English speaker is that I will see progress faster and that will encourage me more. Though I do hear horror stories of German taking multiple years for someone to have a basic conversation - I imagine those speakers were not really motivated or didn't take the learning effort seriously. I don't have a fear of German grammar, especially with genders. Though I don't remember hardly any of it after school because I don't use it at all, I did have four years of Classical Latin, and if I can survive that, then I don't think genders in German will mess me up too bad. That being said, I don't seek to "master" German, only reach a level of being able to converse in it. I would wager that many English speaking Americans would fail a grammar exam in our native tongue, so I want to focus more on being able to talk in German rather than be proficient in an exam.

While German is more of a desire from adulthood, Japanese has been a desire since I was a child. I am drawn by the culture, both traditional and modern. Japan is a great technology center and is home to some of the greatest electronic and gaming companies, at least in my opinion. The food is amazing and yes - the anime and manga. There are more resources available (at least from my findings) and the learning community is vast and accepting. I do plan on visiting Japan in about 2~ years (currently saving/planning) so knowing Japanese at a somewhat conversation level, even if basic, would probably help me out in visiting. Even though it isn't my primary goal, being able to understand anime without subtitles and read manga in Japanese are secondary goals. My primary goal is to be able to travel off of the beaten in Japan and be able to meet more of the locals. Once upon a time, I wanted to live in Japan but that is a far future goal if it still exists.

An additional secondary goal would be speaking more easily to Japanese natives in the online community. I play FFXIV occasionally and there are friends that I play with that rely mostly on the translations to communicate with me. I would love to be able to have a basic conversation with them. The downside of Japanese would be that in-person I do not know any native speakers so conversations would have to rely on online friends, tutors, or locating some locals.

Genki and JapanesePod101 seem to be really good starting good points, though I have not purchased either one yet. I wanted to get Reddits take on which language makes more sense. There is no reason I couldn't eventually learn them both but I would really love to reach a somewhat proficient level in one of them prior to turning 30 (2 years from now, just a personal goal).

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Learning a language by listing and repeating.

Hey guys! I'm looking for the name of a language learning strategy by listing and repeating Audio files. I think it's even named after the scientist who developed it. Can anyone help me find it?

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How many languages can one learn and maintain at native level?

Especially for regular 9-5 working people, realistically speaking. I want to be able to know 4 or 5 languages at native level at most throughout my life and just maintain that. Understanding classic literature, being able to write fairly well(blog posts, creative writing, etc), understanding most of the things you hear and being able to speak as well as a native. I currently only know English and Swedish and a bit of French. I know it’s not a particularly good idea(albeit tempting) to jump into another language already or even thinking about it and I won’t jump into anything until I’m fluent in French. I’m considering learning Dutch and Italian later. Is it feasible to learn and maintain these languages in the way in which I described? Do you reckon I’ll mess up and mix up the languages a lot? Are there any other complications I may encounter?

Thank you in advance.

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How to start watching soap operas? [Thai Lakorns]

Background, I'm intermediate Thai speaker, can hold basic conversations on most general topics. However once I get to television shows I find myself lost. There doesn't seem like a simple way to bridge the gap, how did you guys bridge to level of watching Tv in a language (Thai) that doesn't share much similarities to your native language (English).

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French romance movies/shows to improve my listening?

I'm studying French and I really need to improve both my listening and my speaking, which in my case I know can be improved by watching French movie or shows but all I've ever found are very indie movies with complex plots that I'm not always so eager to watch, and in case I did, I would mostly focus on the story and not so much on the language which is the ultimate goal. So I would like to watch some light-plotted movies or shows in French, which usually are romance/drama. Any recs?

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Textbooks in target/native language

When I look for recommended textbooks I always see a mix of people recommending books that are completely in the target language, but there are also people who recommend books that have translations in it. Does it even matter if the book is completely in the target language or not? Is the one better than the other? What should you choose for grammar books?

Please let me know!

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Resources for learning Calabrian & Abruzzese?

Hey, does anyone know where to find resources to learn Calabrese? Also if you know of any resources for Abruzzese (Pescarese specifically) that'd be great! Thanks!

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I'm studying to become a French teacher

I'm still far from being fluent so this isn't a short term plan. I study foreign languages at a university but I may have to drop out soon for adverse reasons, although I really like my major. So my question is, if I keep studying French on my own and get C1 DELF certification, do I need to have a Bachelor's degree or some other university-level degree in order to get the CEFLE/DAELFE certification? Or will being fluent be enough to take a course for one of these certifications?

Note: needless to say I'm not native in French, not even an English native speaker and not a US or UE citizen.

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Any other options for my language learning?

I’m currently learning Dutch on two separate resources. (I have been for the past 10 days and am really enjoying it) These resources are Duolingo and a book called “Dutch in three months” by Jane Fenoulhet. My goal is not to become fluent just yet, that’s too high of a goal right now, so I’m looking to become conversational in the Dutch language and be as good with reading and writing. Reference to the B2 level.

While Duolingo is good for learning to formulate simple sentences and somewhat simple and (necessary?) vocabulary, I realise that it has flaws and it must be supplemented with some other form of learning to make my learning as effective as possible.

The book I have “Dutch in three months” is good, I’m currently on week two and can already tell it will be great for content as within the first 30 pages I’ve already learned a lot that wasn’t on Duolingo. Mainly grammar and more realistic sentence forming.

Can anyone suggest any other methods of study? I have a PlayStation 4 so I could potentially join a Dutch community but I don’t want to be learning anything that could potentially mean something bad. Is books the way to go or do I need more of a practical approach?

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I have a dream of travelling to different countries and learning their languages

I'm teacher at an English school and I everyday I envy my students. I'd love to be able to go to various countries and go to language schools to learn their respective languages!

I'm talking about going to multiple countries here, maybe working and learning as I go.

Am I being stupid? Has anyone done something similar before? Am I too old? My students are often older than me (24) but I'm not sure what the norm is for other countries' language schools.

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Looking for high school language textbooks for these languages

You know those text books that U.S. high school foreign language classes use? You know, the ones from the 1990s or early 2000s, complete with cheesy dialogues/scenes accompanied by photos of students in the language's country broken up into different panels, often with reoccurring characters? The ones that have little cultural notes like "French students often go to cafés after school for a baguette" or "In Mexico, families set out food for dead relatives on a holiday known as "Dia de los Muertos?"" The ones where every person in every photograph is smiling? The ones that usually have a generic title like "Discover [language]" or some random word from the language?

Well I'm looking for those types of books for German, Russian, and Dutch. I am a high school student, and those types of textbooks always seem to help me learn pretty well. Also, it's always fun to laugh at cheesy dialogues.

If anyone could point me to a title, it would be greatly appreciated.

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Throwback to when I was 18 and learning Japanese. I gave up, and I far from being fluent, but I'm still super proud of my handwriting!

Throwback to when I was 18 and learning Japanese. I gave up, and I far from being fluent, but I'm still super proud of my handwriting! submitted by /u/rhapa
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Austrian German?

Hey guys! There's a chance that I will be moving to Austria in August. I speak absolutely no German, so I wanted to go ahead and start now before I have to live there. As I understand, Austrian German and High German are quite different. Should I just go ahead and try to learn High German (the only one I can find beginner's material in) for these first few months? Or is there some Austrian material for beginners? Thanks

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