Language change

Ok, here we go. So in my school we have this old hindi teacher (let's call her Miss Betty). She is quite an angry old person, who screams at everyone. Now, miss betty is really conservative. Not just the regular stuff, the stuff that is women should not hold hands, should be quiet and all that stuff. I really despise her because of this. But the thing that blew me off was this. Backstory Hindi is extremely affected from English (they ruled us for 200 years) and many hindi words are obsolete. And another thing is of urdu. Hindi is often said to be the sister of urdu. Urdu and hindi are basically the same (go on hate on me). Hindi and Urdu gave each other many words. But since the Partition of India and Pakistan, many people want a new hindi with less Urdu words. Miss Betty hates it when someone uses an English word in a hindi sentence, which is a lot. The problem is that they don't teach us those formal hindi words and expect us to know them from birth!! I believe that language changes are absolutely fine. Kings change, lands change and society changes. We should just accept these changes and should not persecute someone (like miss Betty) for saying something in a way you don't like. What are your thoughts? Edit: formatting and grammar

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I created some Survival Phrases Anki decks for all the major Sinosphere Languages!

Hello Xefjord here~

I have seen a lot of internet polyglots flex their linguistic abilities by showcasing language skills that may not be considered conversationally fluent, but that can still amaze others with their ability to seemingly get by and not have to rely on their native language. While it is debatable if it is actually a noble goal to maintain 10-15 languages at this "Survival" level it did make me realize that reaching a "Survival" level as a stepping stone to conversational really isn't a bad idea, and that it can be done with comparatively very few words and phrases. I decided I wanted to make some Anki decks using roughly 200 important words and phrases that can start me off by helping me reach the survival level, then also offer me a template for building Vocabulary cards that meet a higher bar of quality than most Anki decks currently offer after achieving the "Survival" level. And now I have some decks to share~

I created decks specifically for the Sinosphere languages because I made them both for my own use (as these are the languages I am interested in) and because I also feel like outside of Japanese, Korean, and Mandarin there is very few quality resources in general for Sinosphere languages. I made decks for Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Cantonese, Shanghainese, Hakka, and Vietnamese. Each deck has a "Basic Words and Phrases" section that includes my translated list of 200 words/phrases with pictures, audio, and romanization. Each deck also has a "Core Vocabulary" section that includes a detailed template for cards to learn Vocabulary with (And varying levels of examples. KR deck has 300ish cards while Shanghainese only has 1 card). These are not made to be complete decks (As I would never be able to finish them) but more so to give users the tools to make their own quality cards.

So here is the list I am calling "Xefjord's Complete Sinosphere Decks"

[Xefjord's Complete Japanese] (https://www.dropbox.com/s/twazapd7bzbjxvm/Xefjord%27s%20Complete%20Japanese%20%2819-09-10%29.apkg?dl=0 ) [Xefjord's Complete Korean](https://www.dropbox.com/s/tm6mwpxcw2sfujd/Xefjord%27s%20Complete%20Korean%20%2819-09-10%29.apkg?dl=0 ) [Xefjord's Complete Mandarin] (https://www.dropbox.com/s/l0284jo6hixog4a/Xefjord%27s%20Complete%20Mandarin%20%2819-09-07%29.apkg?dl=0 ) [Xefjord's Complete Cantonese] (https://www.dropbox.com/s/savnjisyilpzvbw/Xefjord%27s%20Complete%20Cantonese%20%2819-09-10%29.apkg?dl=0 ) [Xefjord's Complete Vietnamese](https://www.dropbox.com/s/put0tuzakwmaq3h/Xefjord%27s%20Complete%20Vietnamese%20%2819-09-07%29.apkg?dl=0 )
[Xefjord's Complete Shanghainese] (https://www.dropbox.com/s/3ir2redf4nd47lu/Xefjord%27s%20Complete%20Shanghainese%20%2819-09-07%29.apkg?dl=0 )
[Xefjord's Complete Hakka (No Audio)] (https://www.dropbox.com/s/ybs7ixl50gj2c0k/Xefjord%27s%20Complete%20Hakka%20%2819-09-09%29.apkg?dl=0 ) Disclaimer: Most Core Vocab sections to these are incomplete and meant to act as templates for you to make your own cards. Some cards across both decks are without audio, that is not a bug. I just couldn't find audio. Some decks are not made by me (Like Hanzi/Kanji/JP Core Vocab decks) but are modified to fit the asethetic of my other decks.

If anyone notices any mistakes or issues feel free to message me and I will try to fix them, all of these decks were either translated by native speakers or double checked by them. Sometimes multiple times over. I couldn't have made these without the help of a ton of very kind and generous people who put in the time to translate each of these languages, all I did was compile them. The Hanzi deck is not mine (https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/39888802) nor is the Kanji deck (https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/779483253) or the Core JP Vocab deck which is just a variant of the famous 10K deck.

Hopefully these decks should make it easier for learners of the major languages (JP, KR, Mandarin) to get a good head start in reaching a survival level, and hopefully the quality of the lesser known language decks makes learning them more accessible and easier as well. As I said the templates for core vocab cards (other than JP) are my own custom frankenstein of various decks I look up to and I encourage anyone and everyone to expand upon the existing cards I offer to develop solid decks of their own.

I would still love to make decks for the lesser known Sinosphere languages White Hmong and Zhuang language as well, but need translators. If anyone is interested please PM me. I have a Taiwanese Hokkien deck in the works but it isn't finished yet as I only just recently got the translations. I will try to finish that before the end of the week and will upload it here somewhere.

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Colnol

Colnol submitted by /u/DarKNesStheQ
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Should I continue with my Spanish classes or start French 1?

I’m a sophomore in high school, currently learning Spanish and French, looking to reach basic fluency by the time I get to college, when I plan to take German classes. As of now, I’m currently taking a Spanish 2 class while I learn French at home in my spare time. Would it be more practical to continue with my Spanish classes or take 2 years of French? I’m currently considering the former, mostly because of how commonly spoken Spanish is here in America.

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An Interview with John F. Faneslow

Learning through Play: How Gamification Keeps Children Interested in Learning

GAMIFICATION

by Mark Pemberton

Mark Pemberton, former ELT teacher and co-founder of Studycat, discusses how a blend of game-based learning, both on and offline, is helping children learn languages and connect the classroom to the home.

When you were younger, your parents likely told you to stop playing games and get on with your homework. Games were seen as a distraction from book-bound learning, leaving little to no room for them as a revision tactic. However, fast-forward almost 20 years and gamification has proven itself to be a vital part of any teachers’ toolkit.

Game-based learning has long been a part of the learning experience. We learn through play from the time we’re born, and countries such as Finland have been aware of the benefits of a less formal approach to learning for years. But with rapid technological advances and greater access to devices like smart phones and tablets, today’s digital natives aren’t just accustomed to games online, they have a real appetite for them.

The language of learning

The goal of game-based learning is to maximise the students’ enjoyment and engagement levels by capturing and maintaining their interest in the subject matter. This is achieved by providing immediate feedback; scaffolded learning, where challenges gradually increase in difficulty; forming social connections; and placing an emphasis on fun.

Examples of game-based learning are rife across STEM subjects yet, one of the most potent approaches that I have encountered is within language-learning. I taught my first classroom of pupils an English lesson in Taiwan in 1989. While the children wanted to learn, the lack of resources and traditional pedagogies meant that progress lagged. Instead of creating a fun learning environment, my students and I struggled to tick off the learning objectives day-by-day. Put simply, learning was boring for them.

I was determined to succeed though, and just as the rote approach was boring for them, it wasn’t much fun for me either. So I came to class armed with a range of home-made posters, flashcards and props. Those analogue-style games-based learning lessons transformed the children’s attitude and enjoyment. They progressed rapidly and came to class excited about learning.  Right away it was clear that game-based learning provides a greater sense of ownership and independence, a more relaxed atmosphere, and a willingness to try and try again.

Connecting the traditional with the modern

As any ELT teacher will report, these attributes and a positive outlook go a long way during language learning. It’s not that some people are more gifted with languages than others, it’s about creating an environment that is fun and reassuring and encourages students to persevere. Language-learning can feel like a risk-taking exercise filled with mispronunciations and equivalence issues however, these can be minimised with a game-based approach. By easing the pressure to perform, games build solid foundations through repetition and scaleable activities that progress in line with students’ attainment.

In some form or another, games have long been a part of the learning experience but, in the age of personalised learning, the value of many traditional teaching resources is getting lost. Today, when people think of gamification, their minds go to online platforms and apps that seamlessly guide students through various stages or learning objectives. These are of course incredibly valuable resources and resonate with pupils in a tech-centric era but it is often learning by doing that really helps improve attainment.

Saving teachers time

This combination of app-based learning paired with traditional face-to-face techniques and resources ensures that pupils are engaged and driving their own learning experience. Importantly, it also connects the classroom to the home-learning environment – a crucial element for ESL pupils where practice makes perfect. Connecting the old and the new provides pupils and teachers with best-practice education methods. Crucially though, the way technology has evolved means that we’ve been able to create a solution that enables the concept of blended classrooms to transform into blended homes where students can continue to learn through games.  It also means that teachers save time. Using what I valued when I taught, our dashboard technology allows teachers to play games on digital whiteboards, assign game-based homework to family devices, and receive real time learner outcomes.

Breaking down the walls of traditional teaching has been one of the greatest benefits I have experienced from gamification in language learning. Technology’s advancement now means that children are afforded the opportunity to reflect their classrooms into their home, creating the ultimate flipped classroom while accelerating learning. What’s more, inviting blended learning into the home through gamification has also allowed for greater parental engagement. Game-based learning has demonstrated its ability to foster self-advocacy amongst children, but it is also a great tool for collaboration with peers and parents as friendly competitions and card games emerge.

With the advanced integration of technologies in the classroom and home, teaching and learning practices have rapidly evolved. Edtech is influencing almost every aspect of the modern learning experience and has brought with it a wide range of benefits for pupils and teachers alike. However, it is important to remember the value of paper-based materials and physical games that can also support curriculum objectives to create a holistic learning experience. Finding a way to balance screen time with physical games, get parents engaged in their child’s learning and help children discover the fun of language learning and there is no stopping you!

Pull out box

  • What are some challenges you have faced as an ELT teacher?
  • How has gamification or game-based learning helped you and your students?

Mark Pemberton is a former teacher and co-founder of Studycat – a global leader in education technology, with over 6 million users across the world.

The post Learning through Play: How Gamification Keeps Children Interested in Learning appeared first on EFL Magazine.



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Starting the new school year successfully: A Roadmap webinar series

Every group of students we teach is different. This makes planning our courses around our students’ needs challenging – especially when course book materials are hard to personalise or lack flexibility. 

Roadmap is an eight-level general English course for adults, which has been designed to meet that challenge head-on. It enables you to adapt your classes to fit the needs of every one of your groups.

In this webinar series, which begins on Thursday 12th September, we demonstrate how you can start a new course successfully. You’ll learn how to build learner confidence, and adapt and personalise your classroom materials – no matter how large your classroom groups are.

Each webinar is led by a co-author of Roadmap and deals with different aspects of the course. 

You’ll learn about: 

  • Practical ideas for first-day activities using Roadmap
  • Addressing changing individual needs in the classroom
  • Boosting learner confidence

1. Starting a new course with Roadmap

 In this webinar, Roadmap co-author Hugh Dellar kicks off the series by talking about the difficulty of starting a course with a new book. He gives us a range of practical ways to approach the beginning of term. You’ll come away with lots of new ideas and some great first-day activities to use with the Roadmap course.

When? Thursday 12th September

Register here for 9:00 am (UK time)

Register here for 2:00 pm (UK time)

2. Building learner confidence with Roadmap

In this webinar, Lindsay Warwick explains how low learner confidence can have a negative impact on student progress in the classroom. 

Using a Roadmap lesson as an example, Lindsay explains how we can show our students’ progress and celebrate their achievements. The sooner we can get our students to feel more confident about using English, the sooner they’ll achieve their goals. 

When? Thursday 19th September

Register here for 9:00 am (UK time)

Register here for 2:00 pm (UK time)

3. Finding the right route to develop your learners’ skills

Damian Williams looks at learning as a journey and talks about how we can get our students on the right track by developing their receptive and productive skills.

Covering communication skills and practical tools, he’ll examine Roadmap’s flexible, dual-track approach and show you how it can be adapted to suit your students’ needs. 

When? Thursday 26th September 

Register here for 9:00 am (UK time)

Register here for  2:00 pm(UK time)

4. The best-laid plans – responding to learners’ changing needs with Roadmap

Andrew Walkley offers another perspective on the flexibility of Roadmap, with lots of hands-on practical activities. 

You’ll come away with ideas on how to plan ahead during the course. You’ll also learn how to adapt your content with the changing needs of your students in mind, over the course of the year. 

When? Thursday 3rd October 

Register here for 9:00 am (UK time)

Register here for 2:00 pm (UK time)

You can also catch up on our previous webinar series on our dedicated page. 

About Roadmap

Roadmap is a new, eight-level general English course for adults that recognises every class is different, every learner is unique. 

Roadmap’s rich content and flexible organisation allows teachers to personalise their lessons to give learners the specific language training they need to progress. Engaging and clearly-organised with an extensive range of support materials, Roadmap makes lessons easy to prepare and fun to teach.

Download a sample now or contact your local rep for more information.

The post Starting the new school year successfully: A Roadmap webinar series appeared first on Resources for English Language Learners and Teachers | Pearson English.



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Advice for learning phraseology

I'm not sure that phraseology is the right word for this so I'll try to describe it. I've been learning German for a while, my vocabulary has expanded a lot, and my grammar is slowly getting better. My latest plateau is just learning how to get my head around what things mean in common conversation. Many sentences can be translated word for word between the languages and make sense, others can be translated word for word and make sense after the grammar has been adjusted. The really difficult thing is that some sentences, after being translated, still sound like gibberish to me to the point that I don't have any idea what is meant even when I know every word. This seems to just be differences in how the languages are used.

For a really simple example, you learn that if you want to say 'please' you say 'bitte.' Which is fine until you say 'danke schöne' and someone replies with 'bitte schöne' rather than 'Du bist willkommen' or something to that effect. Not a great example but I hope the point is clear. I've come across entire sentences where the word usage is so different that I can't figure out what they mean until I put it in a translator and it inexplicably spits out a translation that makes sense relative to the scenario, but not relative to the words constructing the sentence.

This is frustrating as it's turned into a bit of a roadblock for me that I'm not really sure how to overcome. The obvious thing is to just practice a lot but the difficulty is that I don't know how to get my head around the reasoning so it's difficult to actually learn it. Memorizing 'bitte schöne' means 'thank you' and not 'lovely please' is easy enough but for less commonly used expressions it's more complicated.

So I'm here asking if other people have had this problem and if you've come up with a clever way to learn these differences. I had a lot of success with vocab and grammar just watching TV and movies with subtitles but with these types of sentences I tend to get lost by the time I figure out what was meant. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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Is using only N -> TL cards more efficient ?

Since I've discovered anki when it comes to language learning I have been creating only such decks.

Although on various websites for learning vocabulary at the beginning only target language - native language pairs are introduced and tested and later on both TL -> N and N -> TL.

For me personally, if the writing system is the same translating to native language seemed to easy and time consuming. So to memorise top 1000-1500 most common words, cloze definition or phrases decks usually I delete half of the cards.

Should I really stick to N -> TL or I'm fooling myself and make learning process less efficient? What's your experience?

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How much time do you all spend per week on learning your language

Additionally, how fluent in said language are you?

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Hey people, what kind of accent does Aaron Paul have ? Not the one on Breaking Bad, the one he normally has (like in the video). Thanks a lot !

Hey people, what kind of accent does Aaron Paul have ? Not the one on Breaking Bad, the one he normally has (like in the video). Thanks a lot ! submitted by /u/yamix15
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ASIAN LANGUAGES MATTER

ASIAN LANGUAGES MATTER submitted by /u/xChuchx
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Arabic Pronunciation question

Which is the correct pronunciation of ر ? Alveolar taps [ɾ] or trill [r]? By "correct' Modern Standard Arabic is the dialect I'm interested in. Also, is it dental or post-alveolar perhaps?

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What's a language that you would never need to learn/use but just "grabs" you anyway?

(Reposting, chose wrong flair)

For all the languages I know or have plans to tackle someday, I have a practical/personal reason to learn them to a very high level. Spanish I hear everywhere and is great to know if you live in the states, German is one of my nana's native languages for example, But as a lover of language in general there are those languages that grab me just because they do.

For me it's mostly Finnish and Basque, both are so different from English in how they work grammatically, packed with features that I can't fully get my mind around like crazy agglutination, split ergativity, loads of grammatical cases ect. Basque is so interesting in that it is not related to any other language that we know of, and is the oldest spoken language in Europe with it's origins still unknown. Finnish is one of the first languages I saw and was like "woah, I had no Idea languages could work this way". I really like how it sounds too, and I Like Finland. Unless I were to move to Finland or Basque territory, I would never have a reason other than personal fulfillment to learn them, I would have not much use for them even if I did know them. You can't just "language" after all. We use language as a means of achieving/doing something else. (If someone would recommend a must read Finnish novel or something maybe I could get started). English proficiency is very high among Finns and Scandinavian countries and in Basque territory most people don't even know the language and I could just use my Spanish with them. I would still totally learn the language if I were to move there in the future.

There are of course many other languages I'd love to at least have a gander at. So what are those language that just "grap' you for whatever reason?

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Speech to text phone app work with the other person on the line speaking?

I'm trying to work smarter as a new phone interpreter. Still not sure if my idea is smart or dumb. Basically I want to speed up the note taking process (I still take my own notes) by using speech to text app like speechnotes for Android while using plugged in mic. I know I can have the speaker on and have the app listen but I think that brings in lots of background noises. What are some common practices to work smarter as interpreter?

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I (native English speaker) studied so much Spanish and Portuguese on my computer that Google Chrome started asking me if I want to translate websites from English

I (native English speaker) studied so much Spanish and Portuguese on my computer that Google Chrome started asking me if I want to translate websites from English submitted by /u/TheKurzgesagtEgg
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Russian letters & their English counterparts

(This question can go with any language with a dufferent alphabet). When learning Russian, is it better to learn the letters by their English counterparts, or learn them as a new letter. For example, would it be better to learn the words with Russian letters and English letters, or figure out how each letter is pronounced without coordinating it with English. I'm not sure if I explained this that well.

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How to balance learning a second language while also attending college?

Pretty much I am entering my second year into college, I started to learn Spanish since Thanksgiving break of second quarter and I pretty much only used Duolingo and random Spanish cartoons as my only source of learning, every day I will just do the exercises and watch one video and be done. I learned a lot of Spanish but it was at a slow pace. However when school ended I spent a lot more time Spanish, consuming way more content, reading SpanishDict Articles and finally actually reading entire books (Currently reading Maze Runner). I like that I am progressing faster but the thing that worries me is that I don't really have a schedule, I just randomly decide studying Spanish whenever I feel like it. What kind of schedule should I have when I return to college? Should I continue reading books everyday, watching videos, how long should I study? I would be interested to know what your language schedules are like outside of breaks

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Bilingual people often mix 2 languages while speaking. This is called Code Switching. This happens because some words and contexts form a bridge between 2 languages and the brain shifts gears to suit a new context. Social and cognitive cues facilitate this change.

Bilingual people often mix 2 languages while speaking. This is called Code Switching. This happens because some words and contexts form a bridge between 2 languages and the brain shifts gears to suit a new context. Social and cognitive cues facilitate this change. submitted by /u/coolestestboi
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How do people do computer programming in other languages?

Random question, not really important. Im learning the python programming language, and its a lot of typing in english. How do people around the world learn programming languages like this? Do they learn enough english to type commands, or are there versions of the programming languages (javascript, c++, etc) that allow other languages other than english to be used?

submitted by /u/newtodyess
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Pretty weird...

Pretty weird... submitted by /u/Rogocraft
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I'm just trying to study, send help

I'm just trying to study, send help submitted by /u/chloecoolcat
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What onomatopoeia does your language use to describe animal sounds?

For example, in english, frogs go "ribbet ribbet". In chinese, they go 呱呱 (guā guā) pronounced "gwah gwah".

Some other weird chinese ones:

Dogs: 汪汪 (wāng wāng) "wung wung"

Birds: 叽叽 (jī jī) "jee jee"

Bees: 嗡嗡 (wēng wēng) "woong woong"

submitted by /u/jentlesmiles
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Anyone know of any discord servers for German learners?

Seems like a good way to practice producing the language, as opposed to just reading or listening.

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