Like some feedback for the language learning song we wrote in class

Hey Everyone, I'm new here and this is my first post, which got lost in moderator limbo or something, solo dios lo sabe. A polyglot language teacher and musician in Galicia, Spain, I thought this song project would be a fun educational project for children learning English (ages 10-12). It is extensible to other languages as well obviously. The description of its process of creation is in the youtube link, I'll keep this post short, in case length is what impeded the post from working in the first place.

Let me know any thoughts or feedback, or if you've done similar things in the classroom, as we will be repeating the process this year. I'd love to get some opinions as I really enjoyed the long process and the students learn lots in this project-based experience. Kind regards!

In this song, children travel to Atlantis with a punk rock unicorn who plays drums in an Atlantis band. The very strange song, product of a brainstorming process, was developed in 8 stages.

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Easy way to greatly increase your vocabulary in your target language

Buy a translation dictionary and transcribe it into a memrise course or a flashcard app. I have been doing this for a few days now and I'm up to 500 words after just finishing with the letter B.

Previously, I spent a few years with Duolingo (completed course 4x over now), other memrise courses, audio lessons, etc.. Already many of the words I've written out from the dictionary I hadn't come across before.

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What made Korean difficult but also easy for English speakers?

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Alternatives to the main Anki iPhone app?

I realize there are dozens of Anki apps out there.. but something I found out today was that the main Anki app you find when you search for it on the App Store is $25... when in the app description it states that the concept and the app is free O-O... why charge $25?

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Common jobs for those who enjoy learning languages

I'm a native English speaking currently learning Spanish and French. I really enjoy learning languages, but I'm not so interested in teaching. I'm wondering if anyone knows of jobs, specifically virtual (remote) jobs, that someone who speaks these languages can do? I know teaching through sites like italki.com is an option, but I'm wondering what other opportunities are out there.

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Brand new Easy Welsh! 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

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Reverting my phone back to English

I am on a road trip with people who don't speak French and needed to put it into English to use the GPS. After having my phone in French for the past 5 years or so, I am having trouble navigating everything in English again. I got so used to the French GPS and navigating my phone in French, that everything seems forgien in my native language!

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How to find foreing people to exchange language learning?

Hello friends! I'm not sure if this is the correct sub reddit to ask this. Well, I really like to talk and meet foreign people and I would like to know if is there an app to find foreign people nearby to exchange language learning. I mean, I would like to meet them personally :)

Thanks in advance!

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Recommendations for self-published books about language learning

Thanks in part to Amazon’s CreateSpace program, over 1000 books have been published about how to learn languages, languages of the world and about comparing languages.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of these are small pamphlets or booklets (under 100 pages) with large print and wide margins that impart only basic or little new information.

However, there are some truly great gems that have been self-published that go unrecognized because they get lost in the shuffle and the embarrass du choix.

Perhaps we can help correct that here. Please post the names (and ISBN or link) to some self-published works (not about learning specific languages) about language learning in general or linguistics that you found to be a valuable read.

To get started, here are some of mine:

Le don des langues (French Edition) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1468159224

The Secrets of Polyglots: https://www.amazon.com/Secrets-Polyglots-Konrad-Jerzak-Dobosz/dp/8362402539

Comparative Grammar of Spanish, Portuguese, Italian and French: Learn & Compare 4 Languages Simultaneously: https://www.amazon.com/Comparative-Grammar-Spanish-Portuguese-Italian/dp/198333426X

How to Speak Any Language Fluently: https://www.amazon.com/How-Speak-Any-Language-Fluently-ebook/dp/B01LXQPQV9

How to Improve Your Foreign Language Immediately: https://www.amazon.com/Improve-Your-Foreign-Language-Immediately/dp/0989387003

Biting the Wax Tadpole: Misadventures of an Armchair Linguist: https://www.amazon.com/Biting-Wax-Tadpole-Misadventures-2008-06-05/dp/B01K9AYAR4

Linguanaut: The Adventures of Learning a Language: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B013CGVWBO

Language Learning for (Reasonably) Smart People: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07F7DSH3L

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Information Gap Activities

Information Gap Activities submitted by /u/being-el
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What should I be focusing on while speaking with a native speaker ?

I am learning Ukrainian, and my SO is from Ukraine so he is a native speaker. We try to practice everyday now. I'm just not sure what to focus on.

Primarily I try to use topics that I've seen in Duolingo so I have a bit of vocabulary fresh in my mind.

He usually will speak only Ukrainian (but very slowly using simple words) and if I don't understand a word then he explains it using other words or sentences but still in Ukrainian.

I was just wondering what's the best way to get the most out of this kind of practice? I do have to google translate words as we talk, but is that not a good idea? Should I be focusing on only using words I know / can think of in the moment?

Should it be more of a question/answer session or just trying to have a regular conversation?

Should I primarily be having him correct my pronunciation, or maybe even solely practicing pronunciation sometimes and not as much just regular conversations ?

Just want to make the most out of these practice sessions :)

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What Austronesian languages do you think are interesting to learn?

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Spanish netflix subtitles

Hola a todos. I’ve been watching tv shows dubbed in spanish along with the spanish subtitles on netflix. However, the subtitles almost always differ significantly from the actual dialogue. The meaning is always the same but the actual words used are very different. Should I watch like this or am i just confusing myself? Is it possible to find more accurate subtitles? Gracias!

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Hi! Does anyone have a library card connected to Mango languages I can use?

None of the libraries near me have it. :(

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Learning a language through writing?

I love to write and currently live in Thailand. You would think immersion would help but only a little with the most base vocabulary. If only a portion of the thousands of words I write each day were in Thai, though, I would learn much faster. I know most of the Thai alphabet.

2 obstacles I see:

1) Learning the grammar

2) having fast access to thai words

I think #2 is solvable with a good dictionary although the one I have lists several words in Thai, making choosing the right one hard.

#1 I'm not sure about how to learn other than doing something more formal/structured.

Appreciate any suggestions you guys have on helping me chart a path to learning mainly through writing (can involve supplements where needed to).

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Hi foreign language learners

Which way do you think is the most efficient way to learn a foreign language?

  1. Reading the book
  2. Listening(or watch) dialogues
  3. Etc

Except for speaking with others!

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PTE Young Learners: Preparing for Quickmarch (Level 3)

Pearson Test of English (PTE) Young Learners is designed for students aged between 6 and 13, and assesses their understanding and use of real-life, practical English. There are four different exam levels (Firstwords, Springboard, Quickmarch and Breakthrough) which integrate listening, reading, writing, and speaking skills, with an emphasis on completing fun, communicative tasks in age-appropriate contexts.  

For further information, read An Introduction to Pearson Test of English Young Learners or visit the PTE Young Learners website.  

Quickmarch (Level 3)

  • Exam time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Equivalent CEFR level: Pre-A2

Download Guide to PTE Young Learners – Quickmarch (Level 3)

Who is it for?

PTE Young Learners Quickmarch is the third highest qualification of the four on offer by Pearson for young learners, and is aimed at those with a CEFR Level of Pre-A2. The test gives young students an opportunity to talk and write about their likes and dislikes; along with future plans and past events. In addition, it is suitable for test takers who can find important information in listening and reading activities in familiar contexts.

How is it structured?

The test is divided into two papers; a written part which lasts an hour, and a separate spoken part which lasts 20 minutes.

The initial written paper is divided into six sections, which are designed to test the students listening, reading, and writing skills. The spoken paper contains two tasks where the students engage in conversation with the examiner, and four other test takers.

Download the guide to PTE YL – Quickmarch for a more in-depth look at the exam format, a description of the task types and an overview of the scoring.

Four low preparation activities to do in class

1. Listening

For the second task of the written paper, students have to answer questions about a conversation they hear twice. This activity will help them to get used to listening to a story, and answering short questions about it.

Prior to the class write a very short story about yourself with a context which will be familiar to your students (such as your last holiday) and include eight comprehension questions about it. Try and vary your grammatical structures in the story, and have questions in the present, past, and future tenses.

Divide your students up into mixed ability groups of three or four, and read out the story to the class twice.

Next, read out the first question to them. Tell them to write their answers down on a piece of paper or handheld whiteboard.

When every group has finished, they hold them up for the class to see, and points are given for correct answers.

Repeat this for the remaining questions, and read out the story again halfway through if they are having problems remembering the details.

2. Reading

In task four of the written paper, learners are required to match five different utterances with representative pictures.

This part of the exam is designed to test their ability to understand functional language in social situations which they might be familiar with. This activity will help them recognize question structures in similar contexts.

Prior to the class, print out five photographs of people having conversations in different social situations, such as in a shop, on a bus, or a teacher in front of a class.

Put students in pairs and ask them to think about what the people might be saying, and write down some of their ideas.

Next give out flashcards which contain suitable answers for the pictures, along with some extra ones as distractions which don’t match any of the pictures.

For example, for a picture of a person holding a dress talking to a shop assistant, the utterance might be: Have you got this one in pink, please?

Ask your students to match up the correct sentences with the pictures. Once they have the answers, take the flashcards away and ask them to write down the utterances from memory. This will help them with their sentence construction and use of functional language.

3. Writing

In the final task of the written paper, students need to complete sentences about themselves which have been started for them, such as about their school holidays. This activity will encourage your students to write extended and accurate responses to similar contexts.

Prior to the class prepare at least five sentences about yourself, for example: I like holidays because… (I don’t have to work and I can travel the world with my best friends).

Put your students into pairs or small groups, and read out the first part of each sentence to them.

They need to work together to guess what your answer might be in each case, and write down their ideas in complete sentences.

Points are awarded for accurate sentence structures, good use of vocabulary, and also for having the closest idea to what you originally wrote.

4. Speaking

In the first part of the speaking exam, the students play a board game with the examiner and the other test takers. Each square of the board contains a question, which they ask to another student, and the game continues until everyone has answered at least two questions. This activity is designed to help your students get used to asking and answering different questions about themselves.

Prior to the class, cut up large strips of paper, enough for at least three per student.

Distribute the paper strips and ask the students to write an opinion question on each one. For example: Who is the best teacher at your school?

Encourage them to vary their tenses and to include the present, past, perfect, or future.

Tell them to scrunch up their questions into a ball. When they’re ready they should throw them around the room at each other in a big “snowball” fight.

After the chaos has calmed down, each student needs to pick up three pieces of paper that they can find, and in turns unfold one and choose a student to ask the question to.

If you want to add a competitive element, divide the class up into teams and each team can get points for accurate answers which include extended information.

Note: If you feel the snowball fight aspect of this activity might pose classroom management issues, have students fold their paper strips and put them in a box. They should then take turns to select three at random.

Discover practice tests and other resources on the PTE Young Learners website.

The post PTE Young Learners: Preparing for Quickmarch (Level 3) appeared first on Resources for English Language Learners and Teachers | Pearson English.



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How can I approach learning another new language?

[NATIVE English]

I, previously, was attempting to learn Russian for a short amount of time. I learnt the alphabet, cracked some words and phrases and began to understand the grammatical structure but ultimately lost interest. I have recently sparked up the interest to learn a language again and after attempting Russian, I have a clearer mindset as to why I want to learn French this time and why I think it'll be easier.

  • I did probably 2-3 years of French in primary school in private, paid, after school classes. I and my group actually got quite far into the language as for how young we were (somewhere from 7-10 years old). We learnt numbers to 100, understood masculine/feminine, learnt words and phrases too.
  • Also did 3 years of GCSE French from years 7-9, although I will admit I didn't care for French at that stage.
  • After proving to myself I COULD have learnt Russian which is definitely a much harder language, I'm confident I could probably progress in French fairly quickly.
  • Despite all this prior French knowledge, I have forgotten a large chunk of it. I can count to probably 40, say a few words and phrases and just about get by in a French shop but thats about as far as it goes these days.

The main and real few questions I'd find awesome if you guys could answer follow:

Does my prior knowledge in French (even though most of it is forgotten) give me and edge? i.e. will I be able to rebuild some of the lost connections memory-wise in terms of the stuff I used to know quite quickly? Has anyone experienced this?

Im most interested in hearing stories of people like me who once had knowledge in a language, lost it and then re-learned a few years later. Did the prior learning help you relearn the language or did it make no difference?

On top of that, if you could recommend any good online courses, CD courses or book for vocabulary for a relatively low price, that would be amazing!

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So I have a love hate relationship with textbooks! Here's my opinion let me know yours

So I have a love hate relationship with textbooks! Here's my opinion let me know yours submitted by /u/maripolyglot
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Ways to get better at speaking a language?

Hello /r/languagelearning, I stumbled across this subreddit trying to find a good answer to my question. You see my issue is that I know pretty good English for example I understand other people and read everything like it's my native language BUT when it comes to actually speaking English I struggle a lot with finding the right words. I want to get to a point where I can hold a conversation like it's my native language without struggling like this. I have read English in school for quite a while but I don't have that opportunity anymore.

I'm sure a lot of you have experienced the same problem when learning new languages, how would you try to solve this if you were in my shoes?

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TEFL and English Proficiency Around the World

The 2018 edition of EF Education First’s English Proficiency Index has recently been published, providing valuable insight into English language ability around the world. The index analysed test results from 1.3 million EF SET (Standard English Test) takers and used the data to rank the English language skills of 88 countries and regions, tracking improvements, declines,…

The post TEFL and English Proficiency Around the World appeared first on TEFL Org UK.



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Why are you learning Japanese?

Why are you learning Japanese? I think a lot of answers will be like "For anime and manga." That's ok. Please share your reason or opinion. If you have any particular reasons, pls also share it. And, how long have you been studying Japanese? What is the difficult part of learning Japanese? I'm just curious.

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I must appease the owl

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Have you guys heard of https://www.loecsen.com?

I found it today by accident, and I may have missed something, but it has a bunch of languages, it's free, and it is simply awesome. I will take a more in-depth look at it later.

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